The Literacy Calendar 2019-2020

Last year, I created a Literacy Calendar - something I'd wanted to sink my teeth into for a long time. I’ve always felt it would be one of those things that's incredibly useful to have and to share with staff, yet something we rarely have time to research or create! It proved so popular amongst... Continue Reading →

Writing Rivers

I originally saw Jon Biddle's excellent Reading Rivers report on the Open University's Reading for Pleasure website. It stems from an idea originally explored by Pamela Burnard (2002) whereby the 'river' was used as a reflective tool to represent key musical experiences. It was then further explored by Gabrielle Cliff-Hodges (2010) with secondary readers and... Continue Reading →

Encourage creativity, set writing free

‘A love of writing can unlock children’s imaginations, aspirations and academic potential. Yet half of school children tell us they don’t enjoy writing because they struggle with spelling, punctuation, and knowing what to write.’  Jonathan Douglas, Director of the National Literacy Trust Half of children in the UK don’t enjoy writing. Half. I’ve often asked... Continue Reading →

The Day War Came

The Day War Came by Nicola Davies, illustrated by Rebecca Cobb Published by Walker Book, £10 (£1  from each copy sold donated to Help Refugees)Recommended Key Stages: 1 or 2 Year Group: 3+ In 2016, our own government refused to allow 3,000 unaccompanied child refugees to enter the UK. Around the same time, Nicola Davies... Continue Reading →

Writing for Pleasure Conference

On Friday 13th July, I attended the UKLA's first ever Writing for Pleasure Conference, hosted at Canterbury Christ Church University. As a huge advocate of writing for and with pleasure, I wanted to find out more about what this might look like in the classroom. The conference featured an introductory talk from Tracy Parvin (UK Literacy Association President),... Continue Reading →

Planning for the Needs of More Able Pupils

Whether or not you agree with the term 'more able' or prefer to think of these pupils as ‘high potential’ (or whether you prefer not to label children at all - after all, don't all children have high potential?), you will inevitably encounter many mixed ability classes in your time teaching Literacy at primary school.... Continue Reading →

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